Ibiza: A Mini Remote Workation

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The island of Ibiza—Eivissa in native Catalan—is known for many things: earth-shaking nightclubs, wild-haired ravers asleep on the beach, and unchecked hedonism. If you had positioned it as an excellent island for digital nomadism, I wouldn't have believed you. But in the early months of the summer, I had my preconceptions turned upside down during an eight-day trip. Unanchor the island from its mythos, and you'll find a paradisiacal corner of the Mediterranean that has found the perfect balance between the high life and slow living.

Where to Stay in Ibiza

Central to my stay was the 1930s terracotta Ibizan Finca we rented. Divided up into smaller apartments, the traditional farmhouse was built around an azure pool framed by potted cacti and striped awning. In the hills, the Airbnb’s balcony overlooked a thick quilt of woodland that blanketed any trace of neighbours. It was so remote, we spent an hour tracing the dusty roads when we first arrived on the island. Our local town, Santa Eulària, sat on the quiet northern side of the island, which is where I strongly recommend a nomad should be if they plan on working.

The island's lively nightlife attracts around 2.4 million tourists every year. But the next generation of Ibizans is connecting with a slower pace of living. Sustainable farmsteads sell organic produce, community-led workshops have sprung up, and artist residencies—as much a part of the hippy legacy as anything else—are slowly becoming the new face of the island.

Where to Work in Ibiza

Over the first two days, I worked from the dungeon-like shade of our finca I split my day into two chunks, with a few hours in between in which I allowed myself pool break. But after bready lunches, I inevitably slipped off into sleepy procrastination come the afternoon. The chain cafe, Passion, was my saving grace. On Santa Eulària’s waterfront, the cool sea breeze swept in through open doors. Quiet although with the background buzz of people, I soon crept back into my usual routine. On other days, I ended up at CROISSANT SHOW IBIZA, where a sparkling array of like-minded people were scattered across its outdoor tables. Its loud music (a result of an in-house radio show) meant meetings were adjourned for the day, but I managed to stay productive.

How to Get Around Ibiza

To get around I hired a Cooltra scooter using the app, which was super straightforward and relatively cheap in comparison to car rental or taxi. If you do need to call a car to collect you, remember you can’t book in advance. While predetermined routes (ie. Santa Eulària to the airport) are reasonable, you can clock up a huge sum of money very fast on the meter freerange. Buses were good if you are searching for public transport, but expect to hike to your final destination. 

Coworking Spaces in Ibiza

Ibiza has a solid collection of co-working spaces, but I wish I had gone to theHUB. Ibiza sooner. Although in-land (7 minutes drive from Ibiza Town) it felt like a luxury beach club, with plump low-seating and raffia lampshades swinging overhead. Super-fast optic wifi was a blessing and it was equipped with meeting rooms, focus desks, and phone booths. HUB had a very versatile set of rates to ensure everyone from seasonal nomads to workcation visitors can have access. And you'll find a slick selection of people gathering on its sun-trap terrace and mingling between its potted palms. Other spots to try could be Project Ibiza and Origin Ibiza

Free Time in Ibiza

One of most memorable days was spent slipping into Ibiza’s relaxed (almost horizontal) spirit. I started the day with an early morning yoga class at Ashram Ibiza, lured by a long-time island resident who had mentioned it the day before. After a smoothie-stop, I headed for swim. The beaches in Ibiza are aplenty, with special mention to Cala Xuclar and Silot, but you can’t get better than Cala Benirrás. Set in an idyllic cove, it’s ideal for swimming. And there is no shortage of parking a short distance from the beach. Four little bolt-hole eateries hem the shoreline which mean you don't have to travel far for an evening sunset meal. On Sundays, the beach flex with local drummers whose evening chorus commences with sunset. 

There was the odd downside. The Hippy Market in the week had been had been a hot exercise in disappointment, as throngs of tourists gathered to buy plastic tat in the midday sun. But I was told about the large hippodrome Mercadillo de Sant Jordi, on the south of the island each Saturday. Far out, I made the journey on an expensive taxi but arrived to yards of stalls, selling the same goods for lower prices, and even more miraculous junk. I found a few treasures including a vintage dress by a 1970s Ibizan designer for six euros. 

Where to Party in Ibiza

And if you were wondering why I hadn’t made mention of the club-scene, I was drawing up to it. On my first day, I wondered straight into the W Ibiza where a sprawling poolside party was unfolding in its open foyer. In Ibizia, a friend told me, there is party occuring at any given hour . The blaring taxi radio acts as night klaxon tipping listeners off to the next rave location. 

I attempted one ‘superclub’, DC-10. Landing from London, I could see this sprawling mecca from the air and its reputation is legendary. But after spending 1.5 hours in the queue, before paying 50 euros for entry (not even high-season rate) I didn’t feel much like dancing. Instead, I looked for residencies at Pikes or Glitterbox at at Hï Ibiza. 

Before going out, do as I did, and fuel yourself on good food. Family-run La Paloma was a beautiful turquoise blue restaurant that serves Mediterranean and middle eastern dishes during the day and Italian cuisine at night.

Reflecting on the plane home I realised Ibiza is essentially one large playground for adults. But don’t let its reputation precede it, it makes for an idyllic workaction if you know where to look. 

Ellie Howard
November 28, 2022
4.0
min read

A Lisbon-based writer and researcher with her work featured in BBC Travel and SUITCASE Magazine. She never leaves a city without visiting a flea market first.

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